Paterson
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb


News for
Paterson (2016) More at IMDbPro »


2017 | 2016

1-20 of 33 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Arthouse Audit: ‘The Red Turtle’ Swims, ‘Lion’ Roars at Specialty Box Office

22 January 2017 10:21 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

As indie buyers determine the fate of this year’s Sundance entries, the specialty market continues to swing dramatically between awards players and soft newbies. New limited releases remain flat.

Showing particular strength is Sundance attendee Harvey Weinstein’s designated Oscar contender “Lion,” which saw a tiny drop as it slowly heads toward wider release. It could get a sizable Oscar boost over the next few weeks. Next week after nominations expect wider breaks for some pictures that have played in theaters for while.

Opening

The Red Turtle (Sony Pictures Classics) – Metacritic: 89; Festivals include: Cannes, Toronto 2016

$21,811 in 3 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $7,270; Cumulative: $39,435

This Belgian animated Cannes breakout (a rare European production from Japan’s Studio Ghibli) opened with high-end reviews in its official initial release in New York and Los Angeles (after an earlier Oscar-qualifying one-week run). The grosses didn’t rise to the level its earlier acclaim promised. »

- Tom Brueggemann

Permalink | Report a problem


24 Political Protest Songs to Put on Repeat Today

20 January 2017 8:25 AM, PST | POPSUGAR | See recent BuzzSugar news »

The Vietnam War, the Civil Rights movement, and Black Lives Matter: political protest goes hand in hand with powerful music. The American songbook is rife with political messages, from antiwar rock songs of the 1960s to hip-hop anthems calling for racial equality. In recent years, we've seen political-message songs touching on everything from marriage equality to abortion rights. This 24-song playlist spans causes and decades, and every track has a message and lyrics that we can learn from. If the outcome of the 2016 election is inspiring you to take action, allow this playlist to serve as your soundtrack. "Fight the Power," Public Enemy Relevant lyric: "Our freedom of speech is freedom or death / We got to fight the powers that be." "What's Going On," Marvin Gaye Relevant lyric: "You see, war is not the answer / For only love can conquer hate." "Fortunate Son," Creedence Clearwater Revival Relevant lyric: "Some folks are born, »

- Nancy Einhart

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: Gravity of Poetic Dreams Carry Weight in ‘Paterson’

20 January 2017 8:12 AM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – What is more ordinary than a man alone with his thoughts, and then applying those thoughts to paper in the form of poetry? “Paterson” is a celebration of such ritual, and other dreams in the working class. It never panders, it never makes the “hero” that heroic, but it does challenge him in an ordinary sense, to work it out as meaningful poetics.

Rating: 5.0/5.0

This is a quiet and low-keyed film, directed by independent icon Jim Jarmusch (“Broken Flowers”), but it resonates with the power of words and purpose. The main character is a bus driver, but his status in life is not determined by what he does, but how he lives. He is devoted to his wife, who also dreams – not of words, but in the ideal of finding her passion in life. This is a concise character study that fires on emotions and intellectual stimulation, not because »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Arthouse Audit: Audiences Skip Martin Scorsese’s ‘Silence’

15 January 2017 10:18 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

This year’s award season continues to yield a robust specialized bounty. The Oscar contenders are led by “La La Land” (Lionsgate) and “Hidden Figures” (20th Century Fox). The public, particularly older audiences, are coming out in big numbers for films that launched in limited release.

That doesn’t extend to new limited openings, with nearly all top distributors holding back until the awards noise dies down. Still, a few are venturing out with smaller less heralded films in New York (along with a plethora of Video on Demand releases). This week sees three of note, led by a very surprising total for “World’s Apart” (Cinema Libre), an under-the-radar 2015 Greek economic crisis drama.

Check out our Award Season video interviews. 

(All figures for three-day weekend through Sunday January 15.)

Opening

Worlds Apart (Cinema Libre)

$14,000 gross at 1 theater; PTA (per theater average): $14,000

This Greek film, which tells three loosely related »

- Tom Brueggemann

Permalink | Report a problem


Paterson – Review

13 January 2017 2:36 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Adam Driver stars as a driver named Paterson from Paterson in Paterson. Got that? He drives a bus in New Jersey’s third most populous city where he lives in a small house with wife Laura (Golshifteh Farahani) and bulldog Marvin. Each day, Paterson gets up, eats breakfast, walks Marvin, then goes to work.  Fascinated by his passengers, he listens in on their conversations. After work he stops by the same tavern for just one beer, then goes home to his wife. Paterson repeats that routine again the next day. A quiet man, Paterson writes poetry in a notebook in his spare time. His words are spelled out across the screen and we often hear him reciting them or working them out as he goes.

On the surface, not a lot happens in Paterson. His bus breaks down, but it’s hardly a crisis. Someone fires a gun in his favorite bar, »

- Tom Stockman

Permalink | Report a problem


Kate Mara's Iraq War Drama 'Megan Leavey' Nabbed by Bleecker Street for U.S.

11 January 2017 12:30 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Bleecker Street has acquired U.S. rights to the Kate Mara starrer Megan Leavey.

Blackfish helmer Gabriela Cowperthwaite directed the real-life drama centered on the bond between a young Marine corporal in a K9 unit (Mara) and her combat dog during the Iraq war.

Edie Falco also stars in the feature, along with Ramon Rodriguez, Bradley Whitford and Common.

Pamela Gray, Annie Mumolo and Tim Lovestedt wrote the screenplay for Megan Leavey, which was produced by Mickey Liddell, Pete Shilaimon and Jennifer Monroe.

Eric Thompson and UTA negotiated the deal on behalf of the filmmakers.

Bleecker Street recently released the Adam Driver starrer Paterson and will »

- Mia Galuppo

Permalink | Report a problem


East vs. West at the Oscars: Will a Coastal Contender Prevail Again?

11 January 2017 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The East Coast and West Coast have been playing tug of war over the top Oscar the past dozen years, and this year the regional divide is especially pronounced.

La La Land” and “Manchester by the Sea,” two of the awards season’s earliest and enduring favorites, represent each other’s coastal opposite: Kenneth Lonergan’s prototypically New England “Manchester by the Sea” is as wintry and repressed as Damien Chazelle’s retro Los Angeles musical is sun-drenched and yearning. It’s impossible to imagine either movie set elsewhere: the chill is palpable from the moment Casey Affleck’s handyman starts shoveling snow at the outset of “Manchester by the Sea.” “La La Land,” by contrast, opens with a gridlock-defying dance routine on a freeway, establishing Emma Stone’s Mia as a wannabe actress driving a Prius, the eco-friendly car popular with the city’s creative class.

Both movies hope »

- Diane Garrett

Permalink | Report a problem


Nsfc Winners pt. 2: Acclaimed O.J. Doc, African-American Pioneers

8 January 2017 9:34 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Only in America: The O.J. Simpson saga [See previous post: Isabelle Huppert & Moonlight among Nsfc winners.] The National Society of Film Critics' Best Non-Fiction Film was Ezra Edelman's five-part Espn Films documentary O.J.: Made in America, about the trials (there were two) and tribulations of disgraced all-American football player and sometime movie actor O.J. Simpson (The Towering Inferno, The Naked Gun: From the Files of the Police Squad!). In 1994, Simpson was accused of murdering his former wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Lyle Goldman in Los Angeles' Brentwood neighborhood. The ensuing trial became one of the ugliest – and most popular – all-American circuses of the second half of the 20th century. With the assistance of a high-profile defense team, Simpson was acquitted of the murders, but at a follow-up civil trial he was found liable for Brown Simpson's and Goldman's wrongful deaths. Years later, in 2008, he would be convicted of and imprisoned for several felonies unrelated to the 1994 murders. »

- Mont. Steve

Permalink | Report a problem


Joshua’s Top Ten Films Of 2016

8 January 2017 8:53 PM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

2016 wasn’t a banner year. Say what you will, even outside the realm of politics, 2016 was a profoundly troubling year that will go down in the history books as a turning point on a global scale. We lost many a legend, and nations are growing more and more divisively divided. However, despite this seemingly ever-expanding divide between not only cultures but sub-cultures therein, the world of film saw numerous films that will forever alter the language with which filmmakers speak to one another and their audiences. Be it profound documentaries about forgotten sub-societies or nuanced and empathetic dramas offering glimpses into underrepresented groups in today’s world, 2016 is one of the great film years of this decade, and these are the top ten films that I can’t stop myself from talking or thinking about.

10. I Am Not Your Negro

Starting off this list is one of the truly great documentaries, »

- Joshua Brunsting

Permalink | Report a problem


Golden Globes 2017: All the winners as they happen

8 January 2017 2:00 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Moonlight, Manchester By The Sea and La La Land have been the awards season heavyweights, trading blows and earning kudos from the various critics groups and voting bodies.

La La Land begins the night with the most nods (seven) for best film – musical or comedy, actress for Emma Stone, actor for Ryan Gosling, director and screenplay for Damien Chazelle, score and song, City Of Stars. As of Sunday it ranked fifth at the North American box office on $51.7m after five weekends of release.

Lionsgate’s musical kicked off awards season last autumn with the Coppa Volpi best actress award for Stone at the Venice Film Festival. It was named best film by the New York Film Critics Circle (Nyfcc) and took second place in the Los Angeles Film Critics Association (Lafca).

Moonlight, named best film by the National Society Of Film Critics on Saturday, has earned six nods: best film – drama, director and screenplay »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

Permalink | Report a problem


Arthouse Audit: Awards Contenders Thrive on Golden Globe Weekend

8 January 2017 10:30 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The arthouse world is thriving, with multiple awards contenders amassing the best pre-Oscar nomination numbers in recent memory. (This weekend’s limited openers are also available on VOD.)

Multiple recent releases are scoring well in wider breaks. December platform launches “Hidden Figures,” “La La Land,” and “Manchester By the Sea” are all in the Top Ten, while laggard “A Monster Calls” also expanded, to far lesser results. (Check later analysis of how these films have sprung from initial platforms to wider runs in Top Ten Takeaways).

Several holiday openers have yet to widen. Sony Pictures Classics’ Oscar Foreign Language contender “Toni Erdmann” fell only a bit in its three initial runs, while Ben Affleck’s “Live By Night” (Warner Bros.) is flailing in four theaters in advance of its wide national break this Friday.

International Release:

Railroad Tigers (Well Go USA/China) – $(est.) 110,000 in 42 theaters

Week Two

Twentieth Century Women »

- Tom Brueggemann

Permalink | Report a problem


Golden Globes 2017: 'Elle' wins foreign language prize

8 January 2017 12:00 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

French thriller Elle starring Isabelle Huppert was named best foreign-language film at the 74th awards show on Sunday.

Director Paul Verhoeven accepted the award and thanked the Hollywood Foreign Press Association “for being so open-minded.”

Of Huppert, Verhoeven said: “It has been a wonderful experience to work with Isabelle. She is so talented. I thank you Isabelle for everything you have given to this movie, for your talent for your audacity and the authenticity your performance. It was wonderful to work with you. I love you, I love you, I love you.”

Meanwhile a trio of British stars has triumphed through their performances in The Night Manager.

Tom Hiddleston won best actor for a limited series or TV movie, after earlier supporting acting wins for Olivia Colman and Hugh Laurie.

Accepting his award, Laurie joked he was honoured to receive an award at “the last Golden Globes.

“I don’t’ mean to be gloomy but if it has »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

Permalink | Report a problem


Golden Globes 2017: Viola Davis wins best supporting actress

8 January 2017 12:00 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The Fences star was named best supporting actress on Sunday night, finally prevailing with her fifth Golden Globe nomination.

“I’m a friend and a fan,” Davis said to her co-star and director Denzel Washington, himself nominated for best dramatic actor, watching in the audience. “Thank you for being an extraordinary leader.”

Lionsgate’s musical La La Land won best score and best song for ‘City Of Stars’ in two early film awards at Sunday’s 74th awards show.

The Night Manager’s Olivia Colman won best performance by an actress in a supporting role in a series, limited series or TV movie but was not present to collect her award.

Shortly before that, the show’s Hugh Laurie won best performance by an actor in a supporting role in a series, limited series or TV movie.

Accepting his award, Laurie joked he was honoured to receive an award at “the last Golden Globes.

“I don’t’ mean »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

Permalink | Report a problem


Golden Globes 2017: Aaron Taylor-Johnson wins supporting actor

8 January 2017 12:00 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The 74th Golden Globes kicked off with a shock as Aaron Taylor-Johnson won best supporting actor for Nocturnal Animals.

Mahershala Ali from Moonlight had been regarded as the frontrunner. “Thank you for putting up with me,” Taylor Johnson said to his wife Sam Taylor-Johnson. “I was not very pleasant in this role.”

In two early TV awards, Billy Bob Thronton of Goliath won Best Performance by an Actor In A Television Series - Drama, while Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series - Musical or Comedy went to Tracee Ellis Ross for Black-ish.

Preamble: Moonlight, Manchester By The Sea and La La Land have been the awards season heavyweights, trading blows and earning kudos from the various critics groups and voting bodies.

La La Land begins the night with the most nods (seven) for best film – musical or comedy, actress for Emma Stone, actor for Ryan Gosling, director and screenplay for Damien Chazelle, score and song »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

Permalink | Report a problem


Sociopsychological Drama with Central Gay Character, French Film Icon Top Nsfc Choices

7 January 2017 9:04 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

2016 movies Things to Come (pictured) and Elle have earned French cinema icon Isabelle Huppert her – surprisingly – first National Society of Film Critics Best Actress Award. 2016 Movies: Isabelle Huppert & 'Moonlight' among National Society of Film Critics' top picks Earlier today (Jan. 7), the National Society of Film Critics announced their top 2016 movies and performances. Somewhat surprisingly, this year's Nsfc list – which generally contains more offbeat entries than those of other U.S.-based critics groups – is quite similar to their counterparts', most of which came out last December. No, that doesn't mean the National Society of Film Critics has opted for the crowd-pleasing route. Instead, this awards season U.S. critics have not infrequently gone for even less mainstream entries than usual. Examples, among either the Nsfc winners or runners-up, include Isabelle Huppert in Elle, Moonlight, Toni Erdmann, Casey Affleck in Manchester by the Sea, and Lily Gladstone in Certain Women. French »

- Mont. Steve

Permalink | Report a problem


National Society of Film Critics Names ‘Moonlight’ Best Picture of 2016

7 January 2017 12:35 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Adding to its list of accolades, “Moonlight” has been named the Best Picture of 2016 by the National Society of Film Critics on Saturday, January 7.

Directed by Barry Jenkins (who also won the Best Director honor), the movie explores the life of a young man’s struggles, told across three defining chapters of his life, as he grapples with his sexuality and broken family. Mahershala Ali, who portrays Juan in the film, also received the award for Best Supporting Actor.

Read More: La Film Critics Association Names ‘Moonlight’ Best Film of 2016

Isabelle Huppert received the Best Actress award for her roles in “Elle” and “Things to Come,” runner-ups included Annette Bening (“20th Century Women”) and Sandra Huller (“Toni Erdmann”). The Best Actor prize went to “Manchester by the Sea” star Casey Affleck, with Denzel Washington (“Fences”) and Adam Driver (“Paterson”) as runner-ups.

Marking the 51st annual meeting of the National Society of Film Critics, »

- Liz Calvario

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Moonlight’ Named Best Picture by National Society of Film Critics

7 January 2017 10:01 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Moonlight,” the coming-of-age story of a gay black boy named Chiron living in Miami, was named the best picture winner by the National Society of Film Critics on Saturday.

In the acting categories, “Manchester by the Sea” star Casey Affleck took the award for best actor, while Isabelle Huppert won the actress prize for her performances in both “Elle” and “Things to Come.” Affleck’s “Manchester” co-star Michelle Williams scored the prize for supporting actress, and “Moonlight” standout Mahershala Ali nabbed the award for supporting actor.

“Manchester” also won the best screenplay award. “Moonlight” continued its run by winning cinematography for James Laxton and director for Barry Jenkins.

The foreign film prize went to “Toni Erdmann” — the film’s lead actress Sandra Huller was a runner up in her category. “O.J.: Made in America” won in the nonfiction category.

This year the group had 38 people vote from around the country. »

- Variety Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


'Moonlight' wins National Society Of Film Critics poll

6 January 2017 4:04 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The drama prevailed in Saturday’s vote, earning best picture, director for Barry Jenkins, supporting actor for Mahershala Ali and cinematography for James Laxton.

Manchester By The Sea earned three prizes for Casey Affleck in the best actor race, Michelle Williams as best supporting actress and Kenneth Lonergan for his screenplay.

Isabelle Huppert was named best actress for Elle and Things To Come, while Toni Erdmann took best foreign-language honours and O.J.: Made In America prevailed in the non-fiction contest.

The Society held its 51st annual awards vote at the Elinor Bunin Munroe Center as guests of the Film Society Of Lincoln Center in New York.

The weighted voting system produced mostly runaway winners, although there were ties for second and third place in the lead actress and foreign-language categories.

Fifty-four members were eligible to vote and to qualify, entries must have opened in the Us during 2016.

Full Winners At National Society Of Film Critics 51st Annual »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Feature: The 10 Best Films of 2016, By Patrick McDonald

5 January 2017 1:08 PM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – It’s that time of the film year, the “Ten Best” lists. In representing my 2016 picks – as “Patrick McDonald” – I looked for the emotional experience as much as anything. I think every filmgoer, from the most casual to the ardent buff, adhere to their favorites through that feeling of connection.

There are honorable mentions all over the place, often just missing the 10th spot – I like to characterize them as all tied for eleventh. My favorite superhero film was “Captain America: Civil War,” for the Marvel Comics angst that works best in this genre of movies. The dramas “Arrival,” “Elle,” “Little Men” and “A Monster Calls” were excellent and heartfelt experiences. I loved the wacky tribute that writer/directors Joel and Ethan Coen gave to 1950s Hollywood in “Hail, Caesar!” And after watching it again after initial reservations, I realized and connected to the ardent celebration in the musical “La La Land. »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Editing ‘Jackie’: How a Classical Biopic Became an Elliptical Ghost Story

4 January 2017 1:47 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Sixteen minutes into “Jackie,” a reporter (Billy Crudup) asks the recently widowed First Lady (Natalie Portman), “What did the bullet sound like?”

A gunshot rings out on the soundtrack and the film cuts to a series of visceral shots of President Kennedy’s motorcade racing down the empty highway, the last of which gives the audience a brief glimpse of the recently shot President, dying or dead, on his wife’s lap.

Read More: Xavier Dolan on ‘Jackie’: ‘It Left Me Artistically Intimidated and Wonderstruck’

The film then makes a jarring cut to an extremely tight close up of a distraught Portman wiping blood off her face for close to a minute of screen time. Not until the film cuts to a wider reverse shot do we realize she’s on Air Force One with her husband’s corpse and the soon-to-be President Lyndon Johnson (John Carroll Lynch).

“You »

- Chris O'Falt

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016

1-20 of 33 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners